The George and Edward Thompson Barn

Lydia Marie Elizabeth Farmington Avenue Ross Barn or George and Edward Thompson Barn featuring an American flag
Lydia Marie Elizabeth Farmington Avenue Ross Barn or George and Edward Thompson Barn featuring an American flag

The George and Edward Thompson Barn

from 75.00

The Connecticut Barn Series showcases barns from Farmington, Southbury, and East Lyme.

This piece earned me The Beonne Boronda Award at the Mystic outdoor Art Festival (2017.) More on the story here.

This original watercolor on 140 lb watercolor paper measuring 11" x 14" and finished with a rough deckled edge and showcases the beauty of Connecticut in the fall.  The deep burgundy hues against rich cadmium red tones and set off by a crisp ultramarine sky. The is the George and Edward Thompson Barn, named after brothers, but more commonly called the Ross Barn, located along Route 4 on Farmington Avenue. It is one of the oldest styles of barns, "English style," which typically featured a side entry and was used for multiple purposes, housing family as well as animals and poultry. This barn was built by the aforementioned brothers in 1884.


When I was living in Connecticut as an adult, driving back roads between stone walls, I surveyed barns in various states, some of them in beautiful working condition, some falling down and others being pulled down. As they disappear from our landscape we lose a touchstone to a golden age of American life; when America was self-sufficient- producing buttons, and wool and paper.  There is a frugal spirit of do-it-yourself that has gone out of style with new wealth and ease. I see glimpses of this old way of life every so often whether it is in a person’s American spirit or as a barn goes whizzing past me on the highway. Old Glory is still inspiring.

Completed June 2017.

This piece comes framed or unframed.

Dimensions 11” x 14”
Price $75 print [AVAILABLE]
signed original [SOLD]

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